Freedom Park is a memorial to honour those who sacrificed their lives to win freedom. It also celebrates and explores the country’s diverse peoples, and our common humanity.

Established as the South African government’s response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. It took into account the public’s need for a memorial to fittingly honour those who sacrificed their lives to win freedom. It also celebrates and explores the country’s diverse peoples, and our common humanity, through compelling stories, performances, exhibits and architecture.

It is primarily a cultural centre. The very morphology of the park, from its architectural style to the sacred symbols scattered across its grounds, has meaning in the South African cultural context, mirroring how history is told and preserved in Africa.

This history is unpacked, and this culture is explored, in the many elements that make up the park.

This history is unpacked, and this culture is explored, in the many elements that make up the park. Freedom Park focuses on heritage as an essential building block of nation-building. It challenges visitors to reconcile the trials of South Africa’s past with its new successes, to nurture understanding and compassion, to foster reconciliation.

Its position, atop Salvokop, mirrors this focus: it overlooks the Voortrekker Monument, the Union Buildings – once the seat of apartheid power and now housing a democratically installed government – and the bustling, inclusive city of Pretoria.